Workshop

When will Australia’s iconic ‘Composite Board’ go?

An iconic “Composites Board” has been left at the end of the long, winding corridor of the Commonwealth Bank building, where it has been sitting for decades.

The composite boards are part of the building’s iconic “Rona” facade, and were the inspiration for the iconic “T&g” boards which have adorned many of Australia’s most iconic buildings.

Key points:The composite board is part of a long-running collaboration between the bank and the Commonwealth Capital Authority (CCA) which manages the buildingThe boards have been a popular feature in Australia’s buildings since the mid-19th century, when they were first designed by an artist named James O’Sullivan (1784-1869)They are also the source of the “Composition” nicknameThe “Comparable Board” was commissioned in 1890, with the idea that “Composing would promote and perpetuate the arts”, and the “Ronagh” was a reference to the “commonly known” Rona facade.

It was completed in 1897, and became the subject of a Commonwealth Bank project in which the Rona had been turned into a modern, state-of-the-art facility.

“We think the composite boards will be the focal point of the entire Rona” said Catherine Aird, the CCA’s chief operating officer.

But Ms Aird said the project would not be completed until 2020, and that the project had been “long and hard fought”.

“I think it will have an effect on people who see it and they’re going to say ‘Oh, it’s just the Rones’,” she said.

“The fact that it’s a part of our culture is part and parcel of what it is.

The Commonwealth Bank has been involved in a long partnership with the CCC, which oversees the building and manages the complex’s assets, to maintain and upgrade the Rondas.”

It’s the only way that you can get people to understand that we’re not just a building, we’re a whole country.”

The Commonwealth Bank has been involved in a long partnership with the CCC, which oversees the building and manages the complex’s assets, to maintain and upgrade the Rondas.

The bank has worked with the building to install the composite board for nearly 40 years, and Ms Airlind said the CBA would continue to support the Ronagh, which had “a special place in our hearts”.

But she said the Ronds would have to be “reclaimed” in the future.

“There is a huge amount of history that needs to be preserved and preserved,” she said, adding the “real purpose” of the Ronda “has changed over time”.

The Ronda has remained in the building since it was built in 1895, but Ms Aedd said it had also “grown” over time.

“Over the years, we’ve seen a lot of changes, not just in the Rondo but in the whole building,” she told ABC News Breakfast.

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